Grace Smith on LinkedIn: Exciting news! (2024)

Grace Smith

Operations and Administration | Inclusion Advocate | Detail-Oriented Project Manager

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Exciting news!

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  • Caregivercare.ca

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    We have been waiting for this! Valuing the Contributions of Family Caregivers to the Care Economy Janet Fast ·Karen Duncan· Keating, Norah Choong KimUsing Statistics Canada’s 2018 General Social Survey, we estimated the replacement cost of the 5.7 billion hours of respondents’ care work at between $97.1 billion and $112.7 billion. Caregivers comprised 22.1% of the sample (6.8 million Canadians). Living arrangement explained most (81-83%) of the variance in the value of unpaid care work, followed by generation (14-15%), income (2%), and gender (1-2%). These findings provide powerful evidence of the economic value of family care work and of the inequalities among family caregivers in the magnitude of their contributions.https://bit.ly/44k9xqKNotably Fast and colleagues also point out that "The invisibility and devaluation of family care work is systemic."Family caregivers invisibility is also a key point in National Institute on Ageing "Enabling a More Promising Future for Long-Term Care in Canada""Looking to the future, the growing care and financial burdens being placed on family members, friends and neighbours acting as unpaid caregivers should not be underestimated, as it could likely threaten the ongoing availability of persons willing to serve in such roles." https://bit.ly/3JTVxvE Ashley Flanagan, PhD Alyssa Brierley Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald, PhD FSA FCIA MacDonald

    Valuing the Contributions of Family Caregivers to the Care Economy link.springer.com

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  • Alwyn Blayse

    CEO and Senior Clinical Lead Physiotherapist AAC Health Group Australia, Aged care advocate (Aged Care Reform Now, Aged Care Justice), allied health and disability advocate. Opinions are my own.

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    It’s an #agedcaretax in disguise. Don’t fall for the spin today when you read about the long delayed (because it’s unpopular and needed to wait until after a by election ) aged care taskforce report. As Charles Maskell-Knight says below, and I’ve been warning for close to a year, this announcement from the aged care taskforce report released today is simply a wealth tax on boomers. But it’s a very, very foolish government in a cost of living crisis who think they can get away with an aged care tax by stealth. Taxing super, changes to rads and home care , and user pays with no guarantees on actual care delivered.Anne Ruston a year ago called this an aged care tax and pointed out that 16 people, many with significant ties to aged care providers, chaired by the governments own minister is hardly a reliable or democratic source of information for government to act on. Especially when you read the background financials that it’s based on which have large questions around their validity and independence from consultants with possible conflicts of interest working for providers and Australian Government Department of Health and Aged Care The report mentions that older people are increasingly wealthy. Really ?????? Where exactly are all these wealthy older people and kids? National Seniors Australia showed 90% of older people are feeling the pinch financially. How can they (or their kids or grandkids) afford user pay and to lose superannuation to fund any type of “extra” care. Rents are up. Houses unaffordable. 22.5% older people are in poverty, one of the worst countries in the oecd for older poverty. Women don’t have as much superannuation , especially older women. Homelessness is rising in this population especially. And safety nets in aged care aren’t well defined or accountable enoufy to actually make sure that there is any minimum level of care. Is allied health and dental an extra? We can’t afford this aged care tax. And we won’t stand for it. There isn’t any of this to pay for ndis. And taxpayers have already paid $8 billion more to have care go backwards.More aged care funding doesn’t equal more quality aged care. Anika Wells and Anthony Albanese. Stop trying to override the royal commission recommendations and what aged care advocates like Older Persons Advocacy Network, COTA Australia, Aged Care Reform Now, Aged Care Justice have been trying to tell you on behalf of older people. And keep your hands off giving our kids inheritance to greedy providers to fund age care that won’t even be delivered. #noagedcaretax #agedcaretax #stealthagedcaretax #agedcaretaskforce #agedcare #anacc #residentialagedcare #homecare #alliedhealth #olderpeoplemattee #advocacy https://lnkd.in/gtjYe8ee

    The Aged Care Taskforce report has been released, finally. But still we wait… croakey.org
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  • Care4Giver

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    Please read, sign and share this petition:It is no secret that our Quebec healthcare system is in crisis. One of the best ways the government can save money is by allowing seniors to be cared for in their own homes. Especially since the Covid crisis, this option is often preferred by seniors for many reasons.Did you know ...- the hourly rate paid to in home care workers through the CLSC Direct Allowance program (cheque emploi) is $19.02/hour? $19.02/hour to take care of an elderly's well-being- hygiene, medication, transfers, meals and light cleaning? Would you work for $19.02/hour doing this? - often, if not always, families need to pay a supplement out of pocket to attract those workers (it could be $5-$15/hour more). When someone needs care, it is rarely just 5 or 10 hours a week. Our clients need 40 to 80 hours a week of proper care. The supplement can add up quickly ⌛️- Caregivers often do not want to work under the CE program because it takes a month to 6 weeks for their pay system to process the caregiver and send out their 1st pay. Imagine waiting a month to get paid? I wouldn't. 💵- Forms have to FAXED or MAILED through Canada Post every 2 weeks on a strict deadline.🤦♀️ If you miss the deadline by a a couple of hours, the caregiver has his/her pay delayed at least another week. (so instead of getting paid every 2 weeks, that pay will be delayed and he/she will only receive it on the 3rd week.This petition is spearheaded by one of my amazing caregivers. She is asking for the government to increase the hourly rate back to $25/hour to make Aging in Place more feasible and sustainable for families and help support workers earn a fair living.As for the mailing and faxing of forms....that's an entirely different conversation that we have been trying to get the CIUSS to adopt.https://lnkd.in/eVShQd4w

    Sign the Petition change.org

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  • The Vanier Institute of the Family | L’Institut Vanier de la famille

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    Research has shown that caregiving is often unrecognized and devalued, and care work and its related costs are unequally distributed within families and society. Estimates of the monetary value of unpaid care work in Canada are outdated and incomplete.To address these knowledge gaps, researchers conducted a study using General Social Survey (GSS) data to estimate the current monetary value of caregiving in Canada, position it relative to the broader economy, and report ways in which care work is distributed among family caregivers.Keating, NorahJanet Fasthttps://lnkd.in/eb5qPAHy

    Research Snapshot: The Value and Distribution of Family Caregiving in Canada - The Vanier Institute of the Family / L’Institut Vanier de la famille https://vanierinstitute.ca

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  • Pierre-Albert Coubat

    Team and talent builder, Innovation catalyst

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    De retour en Estrie ! *Dear Friends,Dear Network,I’m glad to announce that in the coming weeks, I will have the privilege of returning to the Eastern Townships by joining the fantastic team of the Coopérative de travailleurs d'Ambulance de l'Estrie as CEO.This return to the Eastern Townships, and this new commitment to patients’ life, health and well-being of patients, will result in new team successes, and synergies with the CIUSSS de l'Estrie - CHUS, the CCSE and all partners of the Government of Quebec and the public health and social services network. Together, we’ll strive to offer the best paramedical care and services and to strengthen the contribution of our pre-hospital emergency services to foster healthcare access, quality and fluidity.After 5 years at the helm of health and social services funding in Quebec, including 3 years facing the COVID-19 pandemic together, I am very proud of the significant successes that we have achieved. Together, we have:–Made patient-centred funding a reality, putting an end to historic budgets to encourage innovation and foster the adoption of the best clinical practices across Quebec, while achieving more than $500 million in annual savings,–Increased investments in health and social services by nearly 7% annually between 2018-2019 and 2023-2024, in order to meet the growing needs of the Quebec population, in particular by doubling the budgets dedicated to public health and home care,–Succeeded in curbing the closure of private seniors' residences by implementing a series of government measures to support these essential living environments,–Eased the financial burden on our seniors through new tax credits, and by modernizing the tax relief program for more than 50,000 people living in long-term care centres,–Defined and implemented the new See Better to Succeed program to help more than 140,000 young Quebecers to acquire the glasses and lenses they need each year,–Financed and implemented a new program for free medically assisted reproduction,–Abolished the financial contribution to the placement of children charged to parents, thus facilitating the return of more than 20,000 young Quebecers to their family environment in the best possible conditions,–Reduced parking fees in public healthcare infrastructures to facilitate access for all users and their loved ones,–Deployed hundreds of actions, for more than $20 billion invested between 2020 and 2023 to stem the health crisis due to the COVID-19 pandemic,–Harmonized and simplified the management of health and social services resources, by providing Quebec with the most efficient technological tools to enable our network to manage its resources in an integrated and efficient way (the Finance and Supply Management System, which was still a utopia for the network when I took office, is now a reality!).

    • Grace Smith on LinkedIn: Exciting news! (18)

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  • Caregivercare.ca

    996 followers

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    May 2, the second day of Canada's Caregiver Month. Today let's Thank Caregivers for all that they do!The notion is that healthcare providers do most of the care! Health providers supplement the care provided by family caregivers! Family caregivers provide 75 to 90% of the care for people who live in community homes and assist with 15 to 30% of the care in supportive living and long-term care homes.Using the Statistics Canada | Statistique Canada 2018 GSS- Caregiving, Economist Janet Fast found the YEARLY Value of Family Caregiving in Canada is $97.1 Billion https://bit.ly/3yCh735

    Family-caregiving-worth-97-billion_2022-02-20.pdf rapp.ualberta.ca

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  • Julia Huckle

    Leader in Healthcare and Education

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    It's National Caregiver Month. Caregivers may be parents, children, siblings, friends... We are also people with varying knowledge, skills and responsibilities that go beyond our caregiver role. Our people (those we care for) are also a diverse group. The one thing that binds us is that we are in this relationship because we have the relationship, one that is very different than those who do it as a profession. Unfortunately we are often viewed as being hom*ogenous. We are viewed as being a convenience (fall back when the systems fail) yet also as a negative (advocates and our person's voice). Rarely do we get the respect and support that we need (our needs vs what is offered) and deserve (we are people beyond caregivers). This National Caregiver Month reflect on this, the report linked below and other information that you see and hear. Reach out to those caregivers you know. Check in with them. Also reflect on what the impacts on you would be if suddenly you had to assume the caregiver role for someone you have a relationship with and how you would try to manage them. We need deep conversations to truly understand. Let's start now.

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  • Jason Howie

    Partner at Pride Living Group

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    The budget announcement last night of a further $2.2b to be invested in Aged Care is a welcome addition to our care system. Importantly, it is also a strong signal that the Government has been listening and learning from sector experience and feedback from earlier consultation and reform.From a Home Care perspective, there are four items I believe are worth mentioning.1. The additional 24,100 Home Care packages will be welcomed across the industry, and have been needed as wait lists have started to creep up again. It will be important to ensure that these are targeted at levels and regions where they are most needed.2. CHSP repurposing will be controversial, but my personal view is that this is a worthy initiative. The system is not delivering what it has historically for a range of reasons that I won't go into here, and is not easily fixed. It has been stumbling along in the expectation that it will be replaced shortly, but as the deadline continues to be extended, it is appropriate that if outputs are not being delivered, that funds should be reinvested elsewhere. The important issue will be ensuring that overall demand continues to be met through the HCP and SAHP when it is introduced, and the withdrawal of these funds does not leave a deficit of care in the community.3. Workforce initiatives in regional areas are to be applauded. Those of us working in the industry are aware of how acute the workforce shortages were in the early days during and after COVID border closures. While the issue is still live, a range of initiatives from the Government and private players has reduced the impact across the industry. There are however still areas where initiatives are needed, and provided the funds are well targeted will provide some much needed relief in some areas.4. I'm pleased to see recognition from the Government that reform has a significant cost across the industry. The $1.4b being allocated for IT recognises the significant cost of making changes which have been historically carried by providers. It is likely insufficient to cover the full cost of reform to the sector, however its existence is important as it provides a price signal to Government regarding the cost of making changes to the system. The management of the allocation of these funds will be an interesting challenge.Overall it is another welcome step forward, with some signs of a Government that is engaged with industry challenges. There is much for the industry to get on top of with the new regulatory system, changes to wage structures, the new standards and the Support at Home reforms. There are promising signs however of a much more productive working relationship between the industry and Government, and as always, I encourage every organisation in the industry to be engaged with their representatives to ensure our collective voice is heard.https://lnkd.in/eNhcuzsE

    Budget 2024-25: Quality aged care health.gov.au

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  • Liv Mendelsohn, M.A., M.Ed.

    Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Caregiving Excellence and Senior Fellow, Massey College | Healthcare + Equity + Accessibility + Leadership | Optimist.

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    On our second anniversary, Canadian Centre for Caregiving Excellence launched the first national survey of caregivers and care providers. Thank you to the more than 3000 Canadians from coast to coast to coast who shared their stories with us. This new data will inform the development of the National Caregiving Strategy. We're also making the data sets available to researchers nation-wide. 800 (!) of those who answered the survey also volunteered for a qualitative study - phase two is now underway with Dr. Ito Peng and team at the Care Economies in Context at the Munk School at U of T.So what did we learn? 🏥 Caregiving takes a toll on a caregiver’s wellbeing. One in four caregivers report fair or poor mental health. Caregivers are feeling tired (47%), worried or anxious (44%), or overwhelmed (37%) because of caregiving responsibilities. 👷🏼♀️ Caregivers are working an “extra-shift.” Caregivers provide an average of 5.1 hours of care a day, adding up to over 30 hours of unpaid care, or almost the equivalent of a full-time job.👴🏾 Many caregivers are 65+ and may also need care. Nearly one in five caregivers are over the age of 65. Senior caregivers are least likely to access any services or supports to help with their responsibilities – from home modifications, to respite or transportation services.💲 Caregiving can have a significant financial toll. Half of caregivers have experienced financial stress in the past year due to caregiving. One in five (22%) caregivers has provided financial support to their care recipient, with 22% also reporting having spent at least $1,000 per month on out-of-pocket expenses.🙋🏿♀️ Care provider shortage linked to poor working conditions. 80% of paid care providers, such as Personal Support Workers or Direct Support Professionals for people with disabilities, have considered changing careers, citing low compensation, inadequate staffing, discrimination and lack of safe working conditions.💬 Diverse communities face additional barriers and gaps in supports. Racialized, Indigenous, LGBTQ2S+ caregivers are more likely to experience negative impacts of care. For example, almost half of racialized caregivers have experienced financial hardship due to caregiving, compared to 34% of non-racialized caregivers.Springboard Policy Leger Family Caregivers of BC Caregivers Alberta Caregivers Nova Scotia The Ontario Caregiver Organization L'Appui pour les proches aidants #Cdncaregiving

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  • PRB

    5,315 followers

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    The care economy—including nurses, home health aides, and child care workers—is especially important in aging societies like the United States, where one in six people is 65 or older.But the country spent just 0.7% of its GDP on family investments, like paid leave and child care support, in 2021. Among OECD countries, the United States ranked 36 of 38 in this type of spending, just above Türkiye & Mexico, and well below the 2.1% average. And recent attempts to support care work have floundered. The Build Back Better Plan would have invested $400 billion in the care economy, including long-term care services under Medicaid, paid family and medical leave, and better pay for home and child care workers—but it failed to pass after some legislators equated it with socialism.How did America get here, and what can it learn from other countries? Learn more in our new blog by Diana Elliott, our Vice President for U.S. Programs: http://bit.ly/3NPCrIf #carework #careeconomy #aging #childcare #eldercare

    To Fix the Care Economy, the United States Should Look Internationally https://www.prb.org

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Grace Smith on LinkedIn: Exciting news! (38)

Grace Smith on LinkedIn: Exciting news! (39)

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Grace Smith on LinkedIn: Exciting news! (2024)
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